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Huge omission of the Lego Acropolis

I’ve already posted photos of the Lego model of the Acropolis, currently in the New Acropolis Museum (here and here).

The Lego model of the Acropolis, in a glass case, surrounded by a crowd of children and adults in the New Acropolis Museum.

The Lego model of the Acropolis, drawing children and adults alike.

Ever since it was installed, on the Museum’s second floor, I’ve always included it in my tours, especially when I have a young audience.

Being a Lego fan myself, it goes without saying that I find the model exciting. Both the original (the Acropolis) and the medium (Legos) are big favorites of mine but more than that, the model is tremendous fun, with all the little scenes included, some mythological… 

A scene from Greek mythology: unwinding a ball of string to find his way around the Labyrinth, Theseus finds the Minotaur, a bull-headed monster that ate people. Supposedly a scene from a play staged in Pericle's Odeon, to the south of the Acropolis.

A scene from Greek mythology: unwinding a ball of string to find his way around the Labyrinth, Theseus finds the Minotaur, a bull-headed monster that ate people. Supposedly a scene from a play staged in Pericle’s Odeon, to the south of the Acropolis.

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…others historical, and some pure fiction.

Phidias, the designer of the Parthenon sculptures, on the left, screams in horror, as Lord Elgin, on the right, with magnifying glass,  removes the sculptures from the temple for shipping to Britain.

A mish-mash of history and fiction: Phidias (the 5th century BCE designer of the Parthenon sculptures, on the left) screams in horror, unnoticed by Lord Elgin (on the right, with magnifying glass), who is busy removing the sculptures from the temple for shipping to Britain, 23 centuries later.

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But sometimes the archaeologist in me kicks in and I look at it from a more “scholarly” perspective. When that happens, I can’t help noticing some minor inaccuracies in the rendering of archeological details.

For instance, the Caryatids on the Erechtheum are six instead of the mere three shown in the model. Then there are what seems to be triglyphs and metopes on every building of the Acropolis, which should only be on the Doric ones.

Lego Acropolis, erechtheum (4)

The lego Erechtheum. Notice the three caryatids, the line of blue-golden bricks, probably symbolizing triglyphs, and the free-standing columns on the left, among other things.

 

The Erechtheum from the SW. The differences with the lego model are quite obvious.

The Erechtheum from the SW. The differences with the lego model are quite obvious.

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But I won’t let all that get in the way of my enjoying the model. Besides, I understand that scale is a problem when you have to work with Legos, and that the builder did the best he could under the circumstances.

However, I cannot forgive him one grave omission:

he included the Minotaur, Gandalf the Gray and even Indiana Jones….

Indiana Jones, unmistakeable in hat and whip, with sceleton, snake and spider web in the cave of Aglavros.

Indiana Jones, unmistakeable in typical hat and whip, with sceleton, snake and spider web in the cave of Aglavros.

 

– how could he have missed the one and only Darth Vader?

A lego Darth Vader with lightsaber on, from here.

A lego Darth Vader with lightsaber on, from here.

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I expected more from the man who constructed the world’s largest Lego Darth Vader.

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PS. Despite this huge omission, the model remains a favorite of mine with tremendous educational and entertaining value.

If you want to see an accurate model of the Acropolis, true to the archaeological and historic data, you will find what you seek and more on the ground floor of the Museum: a series of models of the Acropolis, one for every major time period, such as prehistory, medieval times, etc.

Acropolis model, Roman times

A model of the Acropolis as it was in Roman times, after the Odeon of Herod had been completed. The view is from the west.

If however you wouldn’t mind a more playful, perhaps a little iconoclastic rendition of the Holy Rock, then the Lego model on the second floor is more suited to your needs.

Whatever you do, enjoy your tour of the museum.

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By Aristotle Koskinas, Greek Tourist Guide Posted in Uncategorized

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