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Quiz of the week: An odd wall

Anyone taking a walk in the historic district of Athens (known as Plaka) will certainly have walked past this wall, seen it, maybe even photographed it. It is the Northern side of the Acropolis wall.

But saturated with too much to see in too short a time, people scarcely ever notice what they see. Or, perhaps, we’re just not very perceptive as a species. The truth is that every single time I ask people to tell me if they’ve noticed anything odd about this wall, I draw blank stares or plain negatives.

And yet -to me- it is plainly obvious that this wall is unlike any other.

Am I wrong? Please, take a look and tell me if you notice anything unusual about it.

I promise to explain the mystery after I get a few of your opinions first.

Acropolis wall, northern side

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6 comments on “Quiz of the week: An odd wall

  1. I was one of those blind folk before you set me straight. Don’t worry, your secret’s safe with me, but I’m just surprised no one else has commented “Yeah, look at those ****” or something. Perhaps you’re right. Not very perceptive as a species.

  2. I didn’t take a walk in Plaka and I don’t remember seeing that part of the Acropolis (it is the Acroplis, isn’t it?), but to me it’s obvious that that part of the wall is like patchwork. Does that cover it?

  3. The wall is partly made of columns from the previous “Parthenon” that has been destroyed by the Persians, before Perikles rebuilt it. Correct?

  4. Thank you all for your comments.
    You’re right David, the wall contains columns from the previous “Parthenon” which was only half-finished when the Persians came to wreak havoc. Notice how the drums of the columns are not fluted (ie. their grooves are not finished yet).
    Katy, I’ll agree with you, the wall does look like a patchwork. The parts with the large rectangular blocks (and the columns) are classical, the ones with the smaller stones are patches made during the Ottoman occupation.
    If you feel like reading more about how the columns found their way into the wall, look here: https://aristotleguide.wordpress.com/2012/12/29/columns-built-into-the-acropolis-walls/

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